1. Excess gas –– we’ve all had it, no-one likes it, and the same holds true for your braking system.

    GM says it needs to bleed the brake systems of 230,000 cars because the vehicles have rear brake caliper pistons that have hydrogen gas trapped inside that could be released into the brake systems. ZF, the manufacturer of the brake pistons, didn't properly temper and chrome-coat the pistons, causing hydrogen gas to remain trapped in the bodies of the pistons.

    This problem may cause your brake pedal to feel “spongy” but it’s unclear if it affects stopping distances.

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  2. Have you heard about the lawsuit that says the side blind zone alert system in the 2013-2018 Chevy Cruze is defective?

    The lawsuit claims that the system fails because the sensors are poorly sealed and over-exposed to elements like debris and road spray.

    GM has filed a motion to dismiss the case saying the plaintiffs are blind to the fact that of 250,000 Cruze vehicles with the Enhanced Safety Package, only 40 (0.016%) needed service during the warranty period according to the lawsuit.

    The decision is pending.

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  3. Chevy started offering an optional "blind zone alert" safety upgrade with the 2013 Cruze. However, they placed the system's sensors on the rear bumper which, according to a new lawsuit leaves the system suceptible to spray from the rear wheel wells.

    The sensors and wiring are allegedly sealed poorly and allow water and debris to affect the systems, leaving owners with non-working systems they paid for.

    Because of the defective design, dealers allegedly can't effectively repair the systems and any damaged sensors are installed in the same problematic locations. The plaintiffs in the case said replacement sensors were on back-order when they brought their car in for service.…

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