1. GM used heat shields that don't curve under the starters in the 5th and 6th generation Camaro, according to a new lawsuit.

    That leaves them exposed to heat and makes them completely unreliable. The plaintiff says the problem is particularly noticable on hot days or after a long drive where the engine gets hot. The car has to cool down before an owner can start it back up.

    Over time the lack of heat protection will melt the wires, damage the fuses, and create all sorts of electrical havoc to the starter's conductors.…

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  2. A proposed settlement will award certain GM owners in Arizona about $200 each for owning cars with ignition switch problems.

    The $6.28 million will be paid to about 33,000 GM owners in Arizona, as long as they purchased the vehicles between July 2009 and July 2014 and didn't get rid of the vehicles before the ignition switch recalls were announced in 2014..

    As with any settlement, there are plenty of stipulations which you can read about here.

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  3. Owners of the 2010-2011 Chevy Camaro are tired of playing "airbag roulette" with their passengers.

    The passenger-side airbag sensor in these cars has a history of problems. It's a pain for the driver, but pretty darn scary for the passenger because the airbag can turn off while they're in the seat.…

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  4. GM is recalling every single current-generation Camaro, all 511,528 of them, because of an ignition switch issue similar to the one that already killed 13 people.

    Or 74 or more depending on who you ask.

    The driver's knee can bump into the key fob causing it to inadvertently move the ignition out of the 'run' positon. Once that happens you're like Popeye without spinach -- just a bunch of flabby muscles you can't use.…

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