1. Every modern headlight assembly has an "aim code" to make sure the lights are oriented properly after service. Unfortunately, those are missing in some new Cruze cars.

    The 2016 Chevy Cruze cars are required to have headlight assemblies marked with a three-digit identifier code used to properly aim the headlights. The cars violate federal safety standards without the codes clearly marked on the assemblies.

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  2. Here's a fun thought --- your Chevy Cruze turbo diesel might be illegal in the USA.

    A new lawsuit claims GM is using "defeat devices" to hide emissions output similar to the ones VW just got raked over the coals for.

    "Attorneys say the plaintiffs tested the Cruze using a "Portable Emissions Measurement System" and found the cars don't meet emissions standards. The lawsuit says the standard is 70 mg/mile, but according to testing, the Cruze diesel cars averaged 174 mg/mile with a high of 557 mg/mile."…

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  3. There's a lot of news about airbags that can hurt you after a crash, but General Motors would like to remind you they can also make airbags that won't deploy at all.

    GM is recalling 308,000 Impalas in the USA and Canada that could have blown fuses resulting in non-responsive airbags. GM started investigating the issue after an employee noticed cluster gauge issues and "passenger presence sensors" with no passenger present.…

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  4. GM admits they dipped their hands into the fuel economy jar and pulled out a couple more MPGs than they should have. Well, I guess dinner is spoiled now.

    Estimates say the fuel economy ratings of the 2016 Chevy Traverse, Buick Enclave, and GMC Acadia are inflated by 1 or 2 MPGs. In a world full of defective ignition switches and killer airbags, it's hardly the worst news out there. However, little discrepancies like that can add up over time.

    Now GM wants to make up the difference.

    While exact amounts are unknown, owners should soon expect to receive compensation ranging from prepaid debit cards to extended warranties.

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  5. Equinox owners, put down those quarts of oil. General Motors' Technical Service Bulletin (TSB 15285C) could be the answer you've been looking for regarding excessive oil consumption.

    Chevy and GMC dealers were told in previous technical service bulletins to install updated engine control module calibration and perform an oil consumption test. This time dealers are told to diagnose the problem and replace the pistons.

    GM says repairs will be made for free (based on warranty coverage) and that the warranty will be extended to 7.5 years or 120,000 miles, whichever comes first.

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  6. Owners of the 2010-2011 Chevy Camaro are tired of playing "airbag roulette" with their passengers.

    The passenger-side airbag sensor in these cars has a history of problems. It's a pain for the driver, but pretty darn scary for the passenger because the airbag can turn off while they're in the seat.…

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  7. GM is recalling nearly 4,800 new trucks and SUVs, and telling their owners to stop driving until their front upper control arms can be repaired.

    GM blames the problem on a bad weld near the control arm bushing, a problem the automaker discovered on a GMC Yukon XL Denali. The faulty weld can cause the control arm to change shape and eventually separate.

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  8. Turns out the flexible steel cables GM used to connect its seat belts to the body of their trucks might be a little too flexible.

    (The) cable can break over time due to a driver repeatedly getting into the seat, causing the cable to bend and eventually separate. GM says it discovered the seat belt problem by looking at warranty data, but no accidents or injuries have been reported.

    More than 1 million Chevy and GMC trucks will need to be repaired.

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  9. **Th

    2016 Chevy Malibu has been recalled for Takata airbags, but it's not what you think. Takata reported two instances of stud weld fractures of the inflator modules during routine testing. However, the inflators weren't produced by Takata.

    Another airbag supplier welded the studs --- poorly, I might add --- before shipping them to Takata. A fractured weld means the airbag will probably deploy out of position in a crash.

    That stinks, but it's better than other Takata airbag problems.

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  10. A Texas man says his Corvette has been loaded with problems from the moment he drove it off the lot.

    After paying $76,000 for the sports car, the plaintiff says he began experiencing problems with the Corvette including failure to start, loud rattling sounds, stalling, problems with the GPS navigation system and problems with the electrical system.

    In the first year of ownership, the plaintiff says there were six warranty repairs requiring 50 days in the shop. He wants GM to buy the car back, but they want nothing to do with that bucket o' problems.

    It's up to a judge now.

    Have you had a similar, repair-filled experience?

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